Michele Di Paola

Hello, I am Michele.

born 1972, raised in Brianza, Italy, with my head being in a lot of other places, my feet on a lot of different paths, my hands on a keyboard since I was 10, luckily and by chance…

I often blog in Italian here, but sometimes in English too, about all my interests: so there is education, specially non formal one, possibly done outdoors, in seminars and training courses I give all over Europe; there are technologies and the net, my beloved ones since a while, which continue to be the most interesting thing in our time – but you have to know how they work, and where to put your hands; there are stories, born some thousand years before the damn word storytelling and which luckily will survive it for many more years – told in old and new ways, from a circle around the bonfire to the last videogame.

Then there is surely more:  I am always uncomfortable being framed into labels and categories, so we will see..
Here you find the blog Facebook page and some more details on what I do, on my LinkedIn profile and on the one from SALTO-Youth European trainers circuit:

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As you may see on my profiles, I started doing youth work in last century, so I would say I have a certain expertise on what does work (and does not) in youth activities realized here and there in Italy and Europe.
I have a great interest in working with myths and rituals of yesterday and today, which I have been studying since many years – keeping far enough from any kind of new-age approach, but trying to find and acknowledge their impact in growth and education. For instance, did you ever wonder where the story of the mouse bringing money when children loose they milk teeth comes from? Or did you ever realize that what the Odissey, Star Wars and Harry Potter have many more things in common than differences? 😀
I also have this strange idea that education (including non formal one) could and should be involving, up-to-date, maybe even amusing – and including technologies and contents of nowadays (as mobile devices and videogames, just to mention some…). So what about videogame-based learning, for instance?
I believe that this should happen without loosing the main focus: designing experiences from which you can extract learning in many different ways, possibly including contact with nature and outdoors activities, that I learnt to value during my many years of being part of the scout movement.

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